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Archive for April, 2012|Monthly archive page

Dengue-Malaria Scare Looms Hindustan

In Dengue Fever, Malaria on April 30, 2012 at 8:39 am

Dengue-malaria scare looms, health dept has no
plans or enough staff

http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/Gurgaon/Dengue-malaria-scare-looms-health-dept-has-no-plans-or-enough-staff/Article1-848237.aspx
The fear of malaria and dengue is looming large over the city this year as well. Besides, the health department
claims lack of manpower to carry out any preventive measures such as fogging and others to check this menace.
A large number of city residents fall prey to malaria and dengue every year.
In 2011, the city reported 153 cases of dengue. Nine people lost their lives. The city also reported 526 malaria
cases.
And this year, as summer is approaching, the department has again showed its helplessness citing lack of
manpower to carry out fogging in the city. At present, the malarial wing of the department has 16 people and the
district health department has written a letter to the state health department for an additional 120 people.
“We have shortage ofstaff in the district. But we willstill carry out fogging and other measures to control the
problem. We are waiting for additional manpower,” said Dr Parveen Garg, chief medical officer.
Residents allege that the health department has not initiated fogging and other preventive measures till now. Last
year, the department was avoiding fogging and other measures saying that fogging was ‘not good’ for health and
was expensive. But this year they do not have manpower.
Riti Singal, resident of Kendriya Vihar said, “These things should have been done well in advance. Now when
mosquitoes have started ruling, the department realised that they do not have manpower. By now things would
have been clear how to control this menace. But they are waiting for some positive cases.”

http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/Print/848237.aspx

© Copyright © 2012 HT Media Limited. AllRights Reserved.

Rio Declares Dengue Epidemic

In Dengue Fever on April 30, 2012 at 8:35 am

Transmitted by mosquitoes, dengue can cause fever, headaches, rashes and bleeding.

By Agence France-PresseWed, Apr 25 2012 at 1:13 PM EST
A boy receives a handout as part of a preventive campaign against dengue fever
AWARENESS: A boy receives a handout as part of a preventive campaign against dengue fever in Brazil in 2011. (Photo: ZUMA Press)
RIO DE JANEIRO — Rio de Janeiro has declared a dengue epidemic after diagnosing more than 50,000 cases of the tropical mosquito-borne infection this year and over 500 in the last week alone.
“We have a plan focused on the epidemic and we continue to be in a state of alert,” Hans Dohmann, the city’s health secretary, said late on April 24, adding that the number of cases had surpassed 300 per 100,000 residents per month.
State-run Agencia Brasil meanwhile reported that 517 people had been struck with the disease last week alone.
The state of Rio de Janeiro has reported a total of 64,423 confirmed cases thus far this year, with 13 deaths, 12 in the city itself.
Last year authorities recorded 168,242 cases and 140 deaths.
Dengue is caused by any one of four viruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.
Symptoms include high fever, severe headaches, pain behind the eyes, skin rash and mild bleeding. In its advanced stage the disease causes hemorrhages.
The World Health Organization estimates there are 50-100 million dengue infections worldwide each year.
Copyright 2012  AFP Global Edition

Artemesin-resistant malaria spreads to Thai-Burma

In Malaria on April 23, 2012 at 7:39 am
April 5, 2012 5:32 PM

Drug-resistant malaria spreads to Thai-Burma border

By
Michelle Castillo
 
mosquito, insect, malaria, stock, 4x3
(Credit: CDC Public Health Image Library)
(CBS News) A strain of malaria that is not treatable by the most effective drug is now knocking on the Thai-Burma (also known as Myanmar) border and growing in its drug resistance.According to Reuters, there is danger that the drug-resistant version may spread through India and Africa.

A new study published in The Lancet showed how the plasmodium falciparum form of the disease, which was observed in Cambodia as early as 2006, has moved 500 miles westwards through southeast Asia.

Researchers looked at over 3200 patients between 2001 and 2010 and recorded how long it took to clear malaria infections from their systems. Not only was the disease taking longer to treat, in western Cambodia 42 percent of Malaria cases had become resistant to artemisinin, widely considered the best drug to treat malaria, between 2007 and 2010.

Researchers predicted this meant similar rate would be found in Thai-Burma border in two to six years. They are proposing further studies to see if these strains of plasmodium falciparum are genetically related.

Malaria is a parasitic disease that includes symptoms of high fevers, shaking chills, flu-like symptoms and anemia, according to the National Institute of Health. First symptoms can occur between 10 days to 4 weeks after infection, and the symptoms can occur in cycles of 48 to 72 hours.

The Center for Disease Control reports that 1500 cases of malaria are reported each year in America, even though the disease has generally been eradicated from the U.S. On the global lebel, 3.3. billion people — about half the world’s population — live in areas that are at risk of malaria transmission. The WHO said that malaria caused 655,000 deaths in 2010.

Almost all malaria-related deaths are caused by the drug-resistant plasmodium falciparum version. Scientists believe the spread is fueled by the incorrect use of artemisinin and fake versions of the drug, White told Reuters.

Dengue Mosquitoes in Film Debut

In Dengue Fever on April 23, 2012 at 7:38 am

LONDON, April 19, 2012 — /PRNewswire/ –

Oxitec, a British company with a new approach to combating the dengue mosquito, Aedes aegypti, has today launched a new educational film, ‘Controlling the Dengue Mosquito – the Oxitec Solution’. The film, which uses clay animation, or ‘claymation’, is intended to improve the clarity, accessibility and transparency of Oxitec’s work and research.

Dr Paul Reiter, Professor of Medical Entomology at the Pasteur Institute, who features in the film, said that the academic community “doesn’t always do a good job addressing the many questions asked of it” and that failing to communicate effectively “can lead to unease about a new approach.”

Dengue fever is a serious, and rapidly growing global Public Health problem. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that between 50 and 100 million people are infected with the dengue virus every year, and thousands die. Unlike Malaria the disease is principally spread by a single species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti. It is for this reason that Oxitec, as CEO Haydn Parry explains, is first deploying its approach on the Dengue mosquito as it has the potential “to impact on global public health right now.”

“The problem is an urgent one: In the past three decades the global spread of dengue fever has been spectacular yet it is clear that none of the currently used control methods are effective. That is why we need to improve understanding of the disease, how it is spread and how the Oxitec solution works,” said Parry.

In addressing real concerns that new technologies are not well understood Oxitec was “inspired to think more creatively about how we communicate and engage people with complex science, which is why we chose clay animation,” said Mr Parry. “This way everyone is given the opportunity to understand and evaluate what we do.”

Clay is an unusual choice for a biotechnology firm but Oxitec believe it is an effective vehicle to engage audiences and deliver their message. Michael Mort of Immortal Pictures, the Bafta award winning claymation artist who built the characters Haedes and Aegypta, also said the project was a very different experience for him, “clay creatures are what I do but I’ve never been asked to build a mosquito couple before!”

As part of their communications effort Oxitec is also launching new branding and a revamped website.

Notes to editors:

To view the film, please visit:  http://www.oxitec.com

To view the most recent press (Wall Street Journal), please visit  http://goo.gl/K6nNb

About Oxitec

Oxitec is developing and commercialising an effective and environment-friendly proprietary technology for the control of significant insect pests. Oxitec’s technology has the potential to make a major contribution for both global health and agriculture by combating insects responsible for serious diseases such as dengue fever as well as agricultural damage. The proprietary technology builds on inventions from the University of Oxford and employs genetics and molecular biology to enhance the existing radiation based Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), and to extend the control method to a broader range of insect pests.

SOURCE Oxitec

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/04/19/4425976/dengue-mosquitoes-in-film-debut.html

Artemisinin-Resistant Malaria Spreads

In Dengue Fever, Malaria on April 9, 2012 at 7:57 am
Image
April 5, 2012 5:32 PM

Drug-resistant Malaria Spreads

By Michelle Castillo
 
mosquito, insect, malaria, stock, 4x3
(Credit: CDC Public Health Image Library)
(CBS News) A strain of malaria that is not treatable by the most effective drug is now knocking on the Thai-Burma (also known as Myanmar) border and growing in its drug resistance.According to Reuters, there is danger that the drug-resistant version may spread through India and Africa.A new study published in The Lancet showed how the plasmodium falciparum form of the disease, which was observed in Cambodiaas early as 2006, has moved 500 miles westwards through southeast Asia.Researchers looked at over 3200 patients between 2001 and 2010 and recorded how long it took to clear malaria infections from their systems. Not only was the disease taking longer to treat, in western Cambodia 42 percent of Malariacases had become resistant to artemisinin, widely considered the best drug to treat malaria, between 2007 and 2010.Researchers predicted this meant similar rate would be found in Thai-Burma border in two to six years. They are proposing further studies to see if these strains of plasmodium falciparum are genetically related.Malaria is a parasitic disease that includes symptoms of high fevers, shaking chills, flu-like symptoms and anemia, according to the National Institute of Health. First symptoms can occur between 10 days to 4 weeks after infection, and the symptoms can occur in cycles of 48 to 72 hours.The Center for Disease Control reports that 1500 cases of malaria are reported each year in America, even though the disease has generally been eradicated from the U.S. On the global lebel, 3.3. billion people — about half the world’s population — live in areas that are at risk of malaria transmission. The WHO said that malaria caused 655,000 deaths in 2010.

Almost all malaria-related deaths are caused by the drug-resistant plasmodium falciparum version. Scientists believe the spread is fueled by the incorrect use of artemisinin and fake versions of the drug, White told Reuters.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57410109-10391704/drug-resistant-malaria-spreads-to-thai-burma-border/

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